OHIO Restaurant

Interview Tips Ohio Restaurant Recruiters

Interviewing Ready Checklist

•    Do your homework on the company.  Read their web page thoroughly.  Visit and eat at their locations. Ask others about them. Read articles, publications, etc.

•    Practice, Practice, Practice.  With a friend, spouse, anyone willing to do a mock interview with you.

•    Bring extra resumes with you.

•    Travel to the interview location the day before to be sure of the address/directions.  Don’t be late!

•    Dress appropriately.

•    Close. Be ready with 5-10 questions you want to ask the employer.  They will always ask you if you have questions, so be ready.  If you want to work for them, tell them you are very interested and excited about the possibilities.  What is the next step?

•    Always write a thank you.  Get the business cards of everyone you interview with.  You may write a quick e-mail thank you,  then follow up with a snail mail.

The Secret to Interview Success

Assuming you’re qualified for the job, the outcome of your employment interview will be dependent on your ability to discover needs and empathize with the interviewer.


You can do this by asking questions that verify your understanding of what the interviewer has just said, without editorializing or expressing an opinion. By establishing empathy in this manner, you’ll be in a better position to freely exchange ideas, and demonstrate your suitability for the job.


In addition to empathy, there are four other intangible fundamentals to a successful interview. These intangibles will influence the way your personality is perceived, and will affect the degree of rapport, or personal chemistry you’ll share with the employer. They are:


Enthusiasm. Leave no doubt as to your level of interest in the job. You may think it’s unnecessary to do this, but employers often choose the more enthusiastic candidate in the case of a two-way tie. Besides, it’s best to keep your options open. Wouldn’t you rather be in a position to turn down an offer, than have a prospective job evaporate from your grasp by giving a lethargic interview?


Technical interest. Employers look for people who love what they do, and get excited by the prospect of tearing into the nitty-gritty of the job.


Confidence. No one likes a braggart, but the candidate who’s sure of his or her abilities will almost certainly be more favorably received.


Intensity. The last thing you want to do is come across as “flat” in your interview. There’s nothing inherently wrong with being a laid back person; but sleepwalkers rarely get hired.


Most employers are aware of how stressful it can be to interview for a new position, and will do everything they can to put you at ease.


Other Important Factors
Since interviewing also involves the exchange of tangible information, always make sure to present your background in a thorough and accurate manner and gather data concerning the company, the industry, the position, and the specific opportunity


A worthwhile interviewing goal is to link your abilities with the company needs in the mind of the employer so you can build a strong case for why the company should hire you. The more you know about each other, the more potential you’ll have for establishing rapport, and making an informed decision.

Restaurant Manager Interviews

A job interview will quickly disintegrate into an interrogation or monologue unless you ask some high quality questions of your own. Candidate questions are the lifeblood of any successful interview, because they create dialogue and help clarify your understanding of the company and the position responsibilities.

In addition the questions you ask serve to indicate your grasp of fundamental issues, reveal your ability to probe beyond the superficial and challenge the employer to reveal his or her own depth of knowledge and commitment to the job.

Your questions should always be slanted in such a way as to show empathy, interest, or understanding of the employer’s needs. After all, the reason you’re interviewing is because the employer’s company recently lost a manager or the concept is growing. Here are some questions that have proven to be very effective:

•    What’s the most important issue facing the company (or specific location).  It could be food cost, sales increase, etc.

•    How can I help you accomplish this objective?

•    How long has it been since you first identified this need?

•    How long have you been trying to correct it?

•    Have you tried using your present staff to get the job done? If so, what was the result?

•    Is there any particular skill or attitude you feel is critical to getting the job done?

•    Is there a certain aspect of my background you’d like to exploit to help accomplish your objectives?

Questions like these will not only give you a sense of the company’s goals and priorities, they’ll indicate to the interviewer your concern for satisfying the company’s objectives

Four Classic Interview Questions and How to Prepare for Them

Experienced job seekers know there are four basic types of interview questions—and they prepare accordingly.

First, there are the resume questions. These relate to your past experience, skills, job responsibilities, education, upbringing, personal interests, and so forth.

Resume questions require accurate, objective answers, since your resume consists of facts which tend to be quantifiable (and verifiable). Try to avoid answers which exaggerate your achievements, or appear to be opinionated, vague, or egocentric.

Second, interviewers will usually want you to comment on your abilities, or assess your past performance. They’ll ask self-appraisal questions like, “What do you think is your greatest asset?” or, “Can you tell me something you’ve done that was very creative?”

Third, interviewers like to know how you respond to different stimuli. Situation questions ask you to explain certain actions you took in the past, or require that you explore hypothetical scenarios that may occur in the future. “How would you stay profitable during a recession?” or, “How would you go about laying off 1300 employees?” or, “How would you handle customer complaints if the company drastically raised its prices?” are typical situation questions.

And last, some employers like to test your mettle with stress questions such as, “After you die, what would you like your epitaph to read?” or, “If you were to compare yourself to any U.S. president, who would it be?” or, “It’s obvious your background makes you totally unqualified for this position. Why should we even waste our time talking?”

Stress questions are designed to evaluate your emotional reflexes, creativity, or attitudes while you’re under pressure. Since off-the-wall or confrontational questions tend to jolt your equilibrium, or put you in a defensive posture, the best way to handle them is to stay calm and give carefully considered answers.

Remember, your sense of humor will come in handy during the entire interviewing process, just so long as you don’t go over the edge. I heard of a candidate who, when asked to describe his ideal job, replied, “To have beautiful women rub my back with hot oil.” Needless to say, he wasn’t hired.

Even if it were possible to anticipate every interview question, memorizing dozens of stock answers would be impractical, to say the least. The best policy is to review your background, your priorities, and your reasons for considering a new position; and to handle the interview as honestly as you can. If you don’t know the answer to a question, just say so, or ask for a moment to think about your response.

How to Answer Interview Questions

Here are eight of the most commonly asked (and basic) interviewing questions. Do yourself and the prospective employer a favor, and give them some thought before the interview occurs.
 
•    Why do you want this job? 

•    Why do you want to leave your current job? 

•    What are your personal and professional goals?

•    What do you like most about your current job? 

•    Where do you see yourself in five years?

•    What are your strengths?

•    What are your weaknesses? (see section on “How do you explain your weaknesses?)

•    What do you like least about your current job? 

The last question is probably the hardest to answer: What do you like least about your current job?

I’ve found that rather than pointing out the faults of others (as in, “I can’t stand the office politics,” or, “My boss is a jerk”), it’s best to place the burden on yourself (“I feel I’m ready to exercise a new set of professional muscles,” or, “I want work in a different restaurant style”). By answering in this manner, you’ll avoid pointing the finger at someone else, or coming across as a whiner or complainer. It does no good to speak negatively about others.

I suggest you think through the answers to the eight questions above for two reasons.

First, it won’t help your chances any to hem and haw over fundamental issues such as these. (The answers you give to these types of questions should be no-brainers.)

And second, the questions will help you evaluate your career choices before spending time and energy on an interview. If you don’t feel comfortable with the answers you come up with, maybe the new job isn’t right for you.

How Do You Explain Your Weaknesses?

The question from the interviewer will be something like “What do you think your greatest weakness is? 

Here is a good approach to the weakness question:

-Choose a skill and explain the flipside.
-Explain what you do to ensure the weakness does not interfere.

Example: “Because I so much experience in restaurants (a skill) and I’m so creative (another skill), I notice a lot during my shift. So in order to avoid getting sidetracked from my task at hand (a weakness), I keep a small notebook in my pocket.  In this notebook I keep a  to do list of tasks and prioritize them (this is how you compensate for your weakness).   Then you can actually pull out your pocket notebook and show him/her. 

The above is much better than just naming your weakness (like saying “I am absent-minded”).
Try to anticipate potential weakness’s (lack of experience, youthfulness, etc.) and work on using those to your advantage.

Do not Talk Yourself Out of a Job

There are two ways to answer interview questions: the short version and the long version. When a question is open-ended, I always suggest to candidates that they say, “Let me give you the short version. If we need to explore some aspect of the answer more fully, I’d be happy to go into greater depth, and give you the long version.”

The reason you should respond this way is because it’s often difficult to know what type of answer each question will need. A question like, “What was your most difficult assignment?” might take anywhere from thirty seconds to thirty minutes to answer, depending on the detail you choose to give.
Therefore, you must always remember that the interviewer’s the one who asked the question. So you should tailor your answer to what he or she needs to know, without a lot of extraneous rambling or superfluous explanation. Why waste time and create a negative impression by giving a sermon when a short prayer would do just fine?

Let’s suppose you were interviewing for a general manager position , and the interviewer asked you, “What sort of food cost control experience have you had in the past?”
Well, that’s exactly the sort of question that can get you into trouble if you don’t use the short version/long version method.  Most people would just start rattling off everything in their memory that relates to their food cost experience. Though the information might be useful to the interviewer, your answer could get pretty complicated and long-winded unless it’s neatly packaged.

One way to answer the question might be, “I’ve opened many restaurants over a 15 year period and established cost controls.  I’ve also taken over existing restaurants with food cost problems and gotten it under control. Where would you like me to start?”

Or, you might simply say, “Let me give you the short version first, and you can tell me where you want to go into more depth.  I’ve had fifteen  years experience as G.M. of various restaurants , and have done everything from establishing controls from the get go, to reducing the food costs in existing restaurants.. What aspect of my background would you like to concentrate on?”

By using this method, you telegraph to the interviewer that your thoughts are well organized, and that you want to understand the intent of the question before you travel too far in a direction neither of you wants to go. After you get the green light, you can spend your interviewing time discussing in detail the things that are important, not whatever happens to pop into your mind.

How Do I Discuss the Subject of Money?

During the employment interview, there’s a good chance you’ll be asked about your current and expected level of compensation. Here’s the way to handle the following questions:

Question: What are you currently earning?

Answer: “My compensation, including bonus, is in the high-forties. I’m expecting my annual review next month, and that should put me in the low-fifties.”

Question: What sort of money would you need to come to work here?

Answer: “I feel that the opportunity is the most important issue, not salary. If we decide to work together, I’m sure you’ll make me a fair offer.”

In the answer to the first question, notice the way a range was given, not a specific dollar figure. However, in a situation in which the interviewer presses for a exact answer, then by all means, be precise, in terms of salary, bonus, benefits, expected increase, and so forth.

With respect to the second question, if the interviewer tries to zero in on your expected compensation, you should also suggest a range, as in, “I would need something in the low- to mid- sixties.” Getting locked in to an exact figure may work against you later, in one of two ways: either the number you give is lower than you really want to accept; or the number appears too high or too low to the employer, and an offer never comes. By using a range, you can keep your options open.

Don’t Come On Too Strong
Unless you’re pinned down in the early stages of the interview, the best time to talk about money is after you’ve established mutual interest. If you initiate a discussion about salary and benefits, you run the risk of giving the employer the impression that money is the most important reason for your job search.

From a tactical standpoint, it makes the most sense to build your value and exercise restraint before the subject ever comes up. The greater your asset value is in the eyes of the employer, the stronger your offer will be. The principal objective during the first and second interview is to explore the opportunity and your potential contribution relative to the goals of the department or organization. Focusing on the money only sidetracks the greater issue of whether you and the employer can be productive and happy working together.

Once you know the job fits—and the employer sees your value—you’ll usually be able to agree on a fair price for your services.

Phrases to work into the interview.

Here are some phrases to work into the interview.  Use your own words. You don’t want to sound cheesy.

1. I am very familiar with what your company does.

Letting a prospective employer know that you are familiar with what a company does shows that you have a legitimate interest in the business and are not just wasting their time. As I state elsewhere: Do your homework before arriving for an interview. This can’t be stressed enough. There is so much information out there.  Check out the company website for information about products and services. Search for the latest transactions and pertinent business news.


Be sure to let the interviewer know that you are familiar with the newest menu changes or expansion plans.  Explain how your skills and experience are a perfect fit for the employer.

2. I am flexible.

Restaurant environments and menus are always changing. Prospective employers are looking for candidates that are open to change and can adapt at a moment\'s notice. In today\'s fast paced business world, employees must have the ability to multi-task.


Stating that you are adaptable lets an employer know that you are willing to whatever is necessary to get the job done.  This may mean working additional hours or taking on additional job duties in a crunch.  Give an example, maybe you worked Sunday nights an extra shift doing F & B inventories when the G.M. had to take off unexpectantly. Show your potential employer that you are equipped to deal with any crisis situation that may arise.

 3. I am energetic and have a positive attitude.

Employers are looking for candidates with optimism and a "can-do" attitude. Attitudes are contagious and have a direct affect on company morale. Let the optimist in you shine during the interview process.


Be sure to always speak positively about past employers. Negative comments and sarcastic statements about past employers and co-workers will make you look petty. If you bad mouth your past company, employers are liable to believe that you will do the same thing to them.

4. I have a great deal of experience.

This is your chance to shine. Highlight any previous job duties that relate directly to your new job.  Discuss your motivational techniques and specific examples of how you increased productivity. Feel free to list any training classes or seminars that you have attended.


5. I am a team player.

Do you remember when you were young and your teacher wanted to know if you could work well with others? Well the job market is no different! Companies are looking for employees that are cooperative and get along well with other employees. Mentioning that you are a team player lets your prospective employer know that you can flourish in group situations. Employers are looking for workers that can be productive with limited supervision and have the ability to work well with others.


6. I am seeking to become an expert in my field.

Employers love applicants that are increasing their knowledge base to make themselves the best employees possible. Stating that you are aiming to become an expert causes employers to view you as an asset and not a liability. You are a resource that other employees can learn from.


This is also a subtle way of illustrating that you have an attitude of excellence. You are aiming to be the best at what you do! This will let employers know that you are not just a fly-by-night employee, but in it for the long run.

7. I am highly motivated.

A motivated employee is a productive employee. Talk about how your high level of motivation has led you to accomplish many things. If you are a meticulous worker, discuss your organizational skills and attention to detail. Companies are always looking for dependable employees that they can count upon.


The bottom Line.

Remember that a job interview is an opportunity to sell yourself to a prospective employer. Be sure to slip in the right phrases to give you the best chance possible of securing that cushy corner office on the ninth floor.




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